Turn Up the Heat on Snake River Dams

Lower Snake River dams make the river too hot for salmon—it’s time for bold leadership and change.

The Snake and Columbia rivers are too hot, and we need your help to protect salmon, Southern Resident orcas, and our communities—now and for future generations. 

  1. If you live in Oregon, sign this petition to Senator Wyden, Representative DeFazio, and EPA.
  2. If you live in Washington, sign this petition to Senator Murray, Senator Cantwell, and EPA. 
  3. If you live in Idaho, sign this petition to Senator Risch, Representative Simpson, Governor Little, and the EPA.

Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a long-overdue plan to protect salmon and steelhead from dangerously warm river temperatures on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This Seattle Times article, by Columbia Riverkeeper’s Brett VandenHeuvel and Jay Julius, a Lummi Nation tribal member, and fisherman, explains the importance of controlling water temperatures and removing Snake River dams.

The plan and study (called a Total Maximum Daily Load or TMDL) is a good start, and it clearly shows how warm water—the result of large, shallow reservoirs created by the dams, coupled with intensifying climate change—threatens the Columbia and Snake rivers’ already imperiled salmon and steelhead. The plan, however, does not require specific actions to cool the rivers.

For the Lower Snake River, the solution is clear: the dams must be removed. 

This will require innovative solutions that bring our region forward together. Speak up today for bold actions—including Lower Snake River dam removal—that will allow salmon, orcas, and river communities can thrive once again.

If you live in Oregon, sign this petition to Senator Wyden, Representative DeFazio, and EPA.

If you live in Washington, sign this petition to Senator Murray, Senator Cantwell, and EPA. 

If you live in Idaho, sign this petition to Senator Risch, Representative Simpson, Governor Little, and EPA.

Saving Salmon

Columbia Riverkeeper fights to protect salmon from dams, hot water, toxic pollution, and climate change.